Album: Devil’s Slide on the move

Why wait till Wednesday?

Posted by on Mon, April 3, 2006

UPDATED: We have created an album of all our photos from the slide, which we will continue to update. You should still start with this article, because the captions will put it in perspective, but you can click here to view the album of all our photos.

We went up past the barriers to see what was happening on the Devil’s Slide.  The action has moved from the subsiding roadway near Pacifica to the Slide itself, where Highway 1 was closed in 1995.

When the slide was repaired in 1995, sensors were installed in the roadbed to measure when the earth started spreading the road again.  That’s what’s happening now. The lights that are connected to the sensors came on late last week and a few more times before CalTrans closed the road Sunday night.

CalTrans personnel on the scene told us that they won’t be able to do anything until the rain stops and the cliff stops sliding.

Click on the pictures for a larger version.

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Barry Parr
Approaching the slide location from the north, you first see the warning lights that a few drivers have seen in the past few days.  The lights are activated when sensors in the roadbed indicate it is widening. The orange circle shows where the cracks have appeared in the road.
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Barry Parr
The crack nearest the ocean shows indications of recent efforts to fill it in.  The faint white paint line moving to the upper left corner of the photo is a paint line that shows where the slide is separating.
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Barry Parr
The middle crack is about as wide as the yellow stripe on the highway and follows a seam in the asphalt.  It goes down about 10 inches to below the asphalt. The white paint line is very visible in this picture.
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Barry Parr
The concrete railing has been sliding toward the ocean for some time now, but it has moved several inches in the last few days.

Click below for more photos.

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Barry Parr
The third crack shows a difference in elevation of a few inches on each site. The lower side is closest to the ocean.
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Barry Parr
You can follow the white paint line of the crack in the earth across the cracks in the asphalt to the cliffs.  That’s Darin Boville holding the video camera.
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Barry Parr
Each of these boxes is connected to cables inside the roadbed. This is the system that detects motion in the slide.
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Barry Parr
The orange circle shows a barely discernible crack in the earth that goes all the way down the side of the cliff.

Great pictures! I drove North on Devil’s slide at 1:30 pm Sunday, and the cracks at that time were noticable, but much smaller than they are now. (I decided to take 280 on my way home at about 5 pm).

thanks for sharing these photos of the slide, since we can’t get to the site but we certainly can partake in the commuter clog it causes, i was glad to see what nature had offered after 40 days and nights of rain. also, it provides a great learning tool for my son who wonders what the sink hole is all about.

Thank you for the great coverage of this. The photos are wonderful.  Keep up the great work!

I took some pictures of devil’s slide from a plane a couple of years ago. No wonder it’s sliding.

http://tinyurl.com/qwnj8

CaliforniaCoastline has some pictures of Montara Mountain from the air as well.
Here’s a direct link with historical comparisons of the slide.

Thanks for all the work you do, Barry! Perhaps now would be a good time to remind people of the free service of http://rideshare.511.org/.