Mike Ferreira asks for recount

Why wait till Wednesday?

Posted by on Mon, December 5, 2005

Mike Ferreira has asked for a recount in the Half Moon Bay City Council election.  He has hired political attorney Peter Bagatelos of San Francisco to assist him the process.  Because there were only about 4,000 ballots, it’s unlikely that the recount will take long. Also, because the biggest questions surround the smaller number of absentee and provisional ballots counted after election night, the Ferreira team’s questions might be satisfied without recounting all 4,000 ballots. But if more questions emerge during the recount, it’s difficult to predict where it will lead. From the county’s release:

According to the Chief Elections Officer, “After the request has been filed, the California Elections Code provides the registrar with seven days to begin the recount. The first step will be for the parties to sit down and go through all the ground rules for the recount—how many observers, the hours, the breaks, the people, the questions, etc.”

“A number of questions relative to the recount will be decided by Mr. Ferreira, including what kind of recount will be requested. It could be a manual count, a machine count, or both. In some instances, a candidate will request that the precincts be recounted in a certain order,” explained Slocum.

The person requesting the recount is responsible for the cost of the recount. Recount costs vary depending on the type of recount requested and the size of the district and number of votes that are being recounted. The person requesting the recount posts a deposit at the beginning of each day for estimated costs for the vote counting to be performed. If the recount is completed, and the results of the election are reversed, the person requesting the recount is refunded the money they placed on deposit.

The person requesting a recount can decide at any time during the recount to halt the recount. They are charged for the time and labor involved in the recount up to that point.

Today was the deadline for filing a recount request. For more information on election law and recounts, see the county’s election website.

Click "read more" to read the county’s press release on Ferreira’s request.

Half Moon Bay Candidate Requests Recount of City Council Race
Chief Elections Officer Explains Process

(Redwood City, CA) – Today, Chief Elections Officer Warren Slocum ordered a recount at the request of Mike Ferreira, a candidate for Half Moon Bay City Council who was defeated by Bonnie McClung by 15 votes in the November 8th election.

When the election was certified on Tuesday, November 29th by the Chief Elections Officer Warren Slocum the time clock began for the period when recount requests can be made. Today, Monday, December 5, 2005, is the last day that any voter can legally request a recount of any contest on the November 8th San Mateo County ballot.

According to the Chief Elections Officer, “After the request has been filed, the California Elections Code provides the registrar with seven days to begin the recount. The first step will be for the parties to sit down and go through all the ground rules for the recount—how many observers, the hours, the breaks, the people, the questions, etc.”

“A number of questions relative to the recount will be decided by Mr. Ferreira, including what kind of recount will be requested. It could be a manual count, a machine count, or both. In some instances, a candidate will request that the precincts be recounted in a certain order,” explained Slocum.

The person requesting the recount is responsible for the cost of the recount. Recount costs vary depending on the type of recount requested and the size of the district and number of votes that are being recounted. The person requesting the recount posts a deposit at the beginning of each day for estimated costs for the vote counting to be performed. If the recount is completed, and the results of the election are reversed, the person requesting the recount is refunded the money they placed on deposit.

The person requesting a recount can decide at any time during the recount to halt the recount. They are charged for the time and labor involved in the recount up to that point.

Prior to the certification of the election, Slocum and the Elections Division staff held the County’s first-ever Vote Counting Seminar for candidates and their campaign volunteers and friends, as well as the press and anyone interested in the elections process. The seminar focused on the counting of absentee ballots and provisional ballots, the process of the official canvass, and the procedure and timeline for requesting and conducting recounts and election contests following the election. The seminar was held Friday, November 18th at the Elections Office at Tower Road in San Mateo to help those people who were in close races to better understand the process. Approximately 30 people attended the seminar.


Comment 1
Mon, December 5, 2005 8:52pm
Barb Mauz
All my comments

Thank-you, Mike, this recount and investigation is WELL in order!

It is only because of pressures put onto the County by well-studied HMB Planning Commissioners, the previous & current City Council that we are seeing any kind of movement by the Coastal Commission to try to get a handle on the run-away, out-law County and their fraudulent “LCP Update” with all of it’s inter-linked schemes to exploit the hundreds, if not thousands of antiquated 25’ Sub-Standard Lots not even represented in the out-dated, over-estimated LCP Buildout Numbers from the 1980’s——THAT clearly is FRAUD, and THAT needs to be stopped!

It was very hard for me to believe that you or all of the wonderful people in HMB who worked so hard to get HMB’s Measure D (1% Growth Rate) and LEGITIMATE, vastly more protective LCP Update, would NOT press for a recount & legal investigation of the suspicious Absentee Ballots & “Provisional Ballots” as well as the election process in what amounts to an attempted take over of the City’s Goverment by Special Interest Groups who would like nothing more than to take the City’s LCP & LEGITIMATE LCP Update and convert it into something akin to the County’s totally exploitive, so-called “LCP Update”.

The County has wrongly used these erroneous old LCP Buildout Numbers to base all of their over-blown assumptions for how many additional houses, people, cars, out-of-scale infrastructure, water supply additions, park/rec & school facility expansions that they & their associated Special Interest Groups would LIKE to get away with shoving into the Mid-Coast.

These are the same Special Interest Groups that have been trying to foul the City’s LCP Update. Clearly, the tax-paying, homeowners in the Mid-Coast will continue to need the City’s help in order to put a stop to the County’s/Special Interest Groups attempts to exploit all of the 25’ Sub-Standard Lots and EVERYTHING else in the Mid-Coast.

Note that there are at least 800 25’ Sub-Standard Lots in the Granada Sanitary District’s Sewer Service Area alone!

Be aware that this County along with associated Special Interest Groups are in a money adicted state and that they don’t care WHAT gets destroyed or WHO gets put at risk in all of their money making pursuits.
 
Once again, Mike, thank-you so much! Please let me know where to send my contribution towards this investiation—-I’ll bet that there are lots of others in the Mid-Coast & in HMB who also would like to contribute in order to right this wronged City Council election.

Barb Mauz (.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address))

 

 

I’d be interested to know about the procedures for ascertaining the validity of the absentee and especially the provisional ballots. Does anyone know? Is a check of this validity part of the recount process?

Is there someone or somewhere one can go to get some questions answered?

The absentee ballots should have been counted before the election because they were due before, but I guess voters were allowed to bring them into the polling places for consideration. How many of this type of absentee voter were there? Was the percentage of ‘at the ballot absentees’ within the average per past elections or more during this particular election?

The provisional votes?  Explain again please what type of person has a provisional vote? 

Is their status the same year after year or is this status something that must be re-registered each year because it may be considered temporary?

Are these provisional voters spread about the HMB city voting districts or are they ‘clumped’ in certain voting districts?

Who checks this, maintains this?

What about the other candidates, how were their counts changed with these additional votes?  I would like to see those results, because to me it is funny how the only candidate effected was the one that ‘everyone wrote off’ to lose, but did have a clear victory on the election day. 

Where would one go see past election ‘overturns’ by these provisional votes?  They seem only to come into play on selective ballots isssues or candidates, of course that is only what it seems like to me.

Please if you can advise me.  Just recounting will not be enough.

Thanks Pat Chimienti

Comment 4
Tue, December 6, 2005 10:57am
Scott Boyd
All my comments

Absentees were due at the same deadline as regular ballots, 8PM voting day.  If they had shown up at the elections office, any of the precincts, city hall, they were to be counted.

Absentees represented about half of the vote this time.  That is up considerably from past elections.

Provisionals are ballots voted by people who claim a right to vote but, for some reason, they would otherwise be unable to vote.  For example, if their name was mistakenly left off the precinct rolls, or their absentee ballot got lost in the mail.  The elections office has to have them vote provisionally so that the election staff can verify that the person did not vote with any other ballot before counting their provisional ballot.

Precinct workers (volunteers drawn from our neighbors) do the work at the precinct for provisionals, but verification of eligibility to vote is done at the elections office in San Mateo.

Voters may request “permanent absentee” status, and an absentee ballot will be automatically sent to their mailing address for each election.

As to how and whether certain kinds of ballots were distributed or “clumped”, no doubt this kind of information will be of interest during the recount.

Generally, votes counted after polls close tend to maintain or widen margins.  That’s what makes this particular race so interesting, seeing a 59 vote lead turn around to 15 the other way.

Scott Boyd
http://voiceofthecoast.com